April 14, 2012
Ad Reinhardt, Abstract Painting, 1960-66
From the Guggenheim:Ad Reinhardt’s writings on art read as a litany of negative aphorisms. Describing his signature black paintings, which he focused on exclusively from 1953 until his death in 1967, he wrote: “A free, unmanipulated, unmanipulatable, useless, unmarketable, irreducible, unphotographable, unreproducible, inexplicable icon.” These canvases—muted black squares containing barely discernable cruciform shapes—challenge the limits of visibility. Reinhardt’s strategy of denial echoed his conviction that Modernism itself was a “negative progression,” that abstraction evolved as a series of subtractions, and he was creating the last or “ultimate paintings.” Rather than forecasting the death of painting as a viable art form, however, Reinhardt was instead affirming painting’s potential to transcend the contradictory rhetoric that surrounded it in contemporary criticism and the increasing commercial influences of the market.

Ad Reinhardt, Abstract Painting, 1960-66
From the Guggenheim:
Ad Reinhardt’s writings on art read as a litany of negative aphorisms. Describing his signature black paintings, which he focused on exclusively from 1953 until his death in 1967, he wrote: “A free, unmanipulated, unmanipulatable, useless, unmarketable, irreducible, unphotographable, unreproducible, inexplicable icon.” These canvases—muted black squares containing barely discernable cruciform shapes—challenge the limits of visibility. Reinhardt’s strategy of denial echoed his conviction that Modernism itself was a “negative progression,” that abstraction evolved as a series of subtractions, and he was creating the last or “ultimate paintings.” Rather than forecasting the death of painting as a viable art form, however, Reinhardt was instead affirming painting’s potential to transcend the contradictory rhetoric that surrounded it in contemporary criticism and the increasing commercial influences of the market.

(via pacegallery)

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Filed under: Ad Reinhardt art 
April 28, 2010
"

The blank page or the page covered with nothing but punctuation marks is like a cage without a bird inside. The real open work is the one that closes the door: the reader, on opening it, lets the bird, the poem, out.

Opening the poem in search of this and discovering that — always something different from what we expected.

Whether open or closed, the poem demands the demise of the poet who writes it and the birth of the poet who reads it.

"

Octavio Paz (via etctatic)

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Filed under: Octavio Paz art birth poetry 
April 19, 2010
Vija Celmins



What I finally did was to leave painting: forms, design, color, and, I thought, invention. I remember being inspired to imagine what is art if you remove all these things. What was left was a kind of poetic reminder of how little a work of art really is art, and how elusive it is to chase the part that excites you and turns one thing into something else. And how tiny that part is, and how hard it is to define. So I was inspired to throw away as much as I could.

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Filed under: Vija Celmins quote art birth 
April 15, 2010
Vija Celmins



I decided to go back to looking at something outside of myself. I was also going back to what I thought was this basic, stupid painting. You know: there’s the surface, there’s me, there’s my hand, there’s my eye, I paint. I don’t embellish anymore, I don’t compose, and I don’t jazz up the color.

April 14, 2010

doublethinkdesign:

"I think the life cycle is all backward. You should die first, get it out of the way. Then you live in an old-age home. You get kicked out when you’re too young. You get a gold watch, you go to work. You work forty years until you’re young enough to enjoy your retirement. You do drugs, alcohol, you party, you get ready for high school. You go to grade school, you become a kid, you play, you have no responsibilities, you become a little baby, you go back into the womb, you spend your last nine months floating — and you finish off as an orgasm."

George Carlin.

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Filed under: quote art birth 
April 3, 2010
Carl Andre

My life has been a search for
my true limits.
Such limits define an artist.
Twenty years ago I realized that
my vocation was to use my
materials as cuts into space
rather than cutting into the
space of my materials.

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Filed under: Carl Andre quote art birth 
April 3, 2010
Richard Prince

I thought the kind of
art I had done before
the photographs was
bullshit. I came to this
conclusion and I collapsed.

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Filed under: Richard Prince quote art b birth 
April 2, 2010
Richard Prince


By expressing
myself in the way
I did, I was asking
myself how I could
take weight for
what I was doing.
And I could not do
it any more.
That’s why I could
not ask anybody
else to take weight
for it any
longer. It had
something to do
with my personality.
I tried to get rid of
my own personality.
And at that time
I was looking to
establish a sort of
fact in my work
instead of having
people speculating
on what it was about.

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